iPodiatry

Updates of whats up in Podiatry

Do bunion correctors work?

Bunion correctors are splints that are supposed to hold the big toe in a correct position and fix bunions. Lots of questions get asked online if they work (see here and here for examples). There does seem to be a moderate consensus that they may help a small amount.

Bunion correctors probably do not fix bunions, but will improve the angle of the big toe a small amount. Only surgery will make it go away.

There is a lot of marketing hype around the selling of these. See this: Bunion corrector gullibility. Don’t fall for it. At best, they will improve the ankle of teh big toe by a small amount and may be helpful with the pain in the joint. That may be a good thing.

October 3, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Comments Off on Do bunion correctors work?

Archies Arch Support Thongs

Firstly, in Australia they call flip flops “thongs”! The Archies Thongs are are proving very popular in Australia for those who do and do not need foot orthotic support and want to wear a flip flop type of footwear to to the warmer climates. The flip flop has a built in arch support that is both effective and comfortable.

A number of podiatry clinics are stocking them and you can get them online.

They were design by a phsyiotherapist in Melbourne, Australia. The amount of arch support in them is comparable to a typical ‘over-the-counter’ premade foot support, which is why they are so popular.

October 3, 2019 Posted by | Footwear | Comments Off on Archies Arch Support Thongs

Gowers Sign

Gower’s sign is a neurological symptom that was first described in how a child with the sign gets up from the floor:
(i) the child initially adopts a prone position on all fours before they attempt to stand
(ii) the child uses their hand to ‘walk up their legs’

Gower’s sign occurs when there is a weakness of the core or pelvic muscles. The most common reason for the sign is Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy.

August 31, 2015 Posted by | Uncategorized | Comments Off on Gowers Sign

The Ipswich Touch Test

The loss of sensation in the foot in those with diabetes is a significant problem. There are many different ways that a podiatrist can assess that, ranging from the use of sophisticated tools to simple tests. The recently validated Ipswich Touch Test is one of the simplest:

The Ipswich Touch Test is done by lightly touching the tip of the 5th, 3rd and 1st toes of both feet and seeing if they can feel the touch. Its that simple – it has been shown to be valid and have good sensitivity and specificity for sensory loss. It is not too difficult to imagine what could happen to the foot if they can not feel it being touched. Check these resources on it.

March 8, 2015 Posted by | Diabetes | | Comments Off on The Ipswich Touch Test

Ankylosing Spondylitis and the Foot

Ankylosing spondylitis is a problem that mostly affects the spine with a form of arthritis. It can also affect other points and some other organs. The problem in the spine affects mobility and creates a progressive deformity that will need a lot of physical therapy to manage.

It affects the foot in three ways:
1. The arthritis like symptoms can affect the joints in the foot
2. Pain in the heel similar to plantar fasciitis is common
3. Due to the affect on the spine, the ability to reach the feet and do self-care is difficult.

December 5, 2014 Posted by | Arthritis | | Comments Off on Ankylosing Spondylitis and the Foot

What is an Abductory Twist?

An abductory twist is an observation made during gait in which there is a sudden abduction of the heel just as the heel comes off the ground. Some call this a medial heel whip.

There are two schools of thought as to what causes an abductory twist:

1) The one described in the video is the most commonly believed reason and is due to a foot that is overpronating as the leg is externally rotating. As soon as load comes of the heel, this causes the foot to suddenly abduct. The pathomechanics of this is discussed in detail here. Those who subscribe to this reason tend to call it an abduct0ry twist.

2) The other believed cause is that there is a weakness of the hip abductors. Those who subscribe to this view tend to call it a medial heel whip.

 

October 8, 2014 Posted by | Biomechanics | | Comments Off on What is an Abductory Twist?

A Podiatry Friend in Croydon, Australia

A huge shout out to my friends downunder at Croydon Total Footcare. They are a well established podiatry clinic that have been very supportive of what I do, hence the shout out.

You can read more about then at Yelp, on Podiatrists Online, a map at Whereis, a listing on Bing local, at the Podiatry Tradeshow, at True Local where they support the community, and at Podiatry TV. They also have a good write up at PodiaPaedia and Rate MD and indexed at dLook.

September 9, 2014 Posted by | Uncategorized | | Comments Off on A Podiatry Friend in Croydon, Australia

Trench Foot

Trench foot was a cold injury that was really common in the trenches during war time. Th soldiers were subjected to cold and damp as well as unsanitary conditions. This no freezing injury affected a lot of soldiers and still is an issue in today’s armies.

It is just not a problem now for the army, but trench foot can occur in extreme sports in cold environments and in those with occupational risk such as cold store workers. It is more appropriately called a non-freezing cold injury. Frostbite is a freezing cold injury and the cold directly damages the tissues. In a non-freezing cold injury the tissue damage is more related to changes in the circulation.

September 29, 2013 Posted by | Skin Condtions | | Comments Off on Trench Foot

Running Drills

With all the interest in recent years on running technique and running form, more and more runners are now spending time to do running drills to help improve their running technique. One of these drills is the 100 Up technique, which is supposed to help teach a better running technique with a forefoot strike. It was first used in the 1800’s and has recently being “rediscovered”.

With its “rediscovery”, it has certainly been given a lot of publicity, but very little critical analysis, as there are some problems with it.

September 1, 2013 Posted by | Sports Medicine | , | Comments Off on Running Drills

Calcaneal Apophysitis

Calcaneal Apophysitis is the technical name for severs disease. This is an injury or inflammation to the back of the heel bone in growing kids. The classic symptom is pain on squeezing the sides of the heel bone. The pain is usually present with activity and can limit sports participation.

The standard treatment for this condition is to use a heel raise to lesson the pull from the achilles tendon and cushion the impacts with the ground. A reduction is sports activity is often needed. If none of these treatments help, then calcaneal apophysitis should be placed in a walking cast.

December 12, 2012 Posted by | Foot Problems | , | Comments Off on Calcaneal Apophysitis